WHAT WRITERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT GROWING UP AND GETTING OLD

We all stumble across similar ideas as we age, and some of these revelations have passed into the books we love. Journalist Joshua Prager explores the stages of life through quotes from great writers. Full interview here: http://n.pr/1UaSd17
  1. Arthur Rimbaud on being 17
    “No one's serious at 17, when lindens line the promenade.”
  2. Charles Dickens on being 21
    “I have come legally to man's estate. I have attained the dignity of 21. But this is a sort of dignity that may be thrust upon one. Let me think what I have achieved.”
  3. F. Scott Fitzgerald on being 30
    “The promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning briefcase of enthusiasm, thinning hair.”
  4. Norman Mailer on being 44
    “He felt...as if he's were a solid embodiment of bone, muscle, heart, mind and sentiment, to be a man as if he had arrived.”
  5. Fyodor Dostoevsky on being 55
    “The flowering time of existence, when real enjoyment of life begins.”
  6. Doris Lessing on being 65
    “There was nothing to getting old - quite pleasurable really, for if this or that good took itself off, then all kinds of pleasures unsuspected by the young presented themselves, and one often found oneself wondering what the next surprise would be."