Women's March on Washington: thoughts & next steps

  1. So I went to the Women's March on Washington, D.C. this weekend with my boyfriend Dan.
  2. We left from his apartment around 9:30 and couldn't get onto the metro at Rosslyn because it was so crowded. We ended up sharing an uber with another marcher. The uber couldn't even get close to the March, but that was okay.
  3. We got onto the mall and headed toward the march, which was actually a block away on independence Ave.
  4. We ended up on the wall of the Hirschhorn Museum. We hung out there for quite a while, during which speakers like Scarlett Johanneson, Michael Moore, Cecile Richards, Janet Mock, etc spoke
    JANELLE MONAE HAD SUCH A GOOD AREOLA LINE OMG. It was so crowded and we were pulling women up onto the wall (ironically). And just getting fucking AMPED.
  5. The march was supposed to go down Independence Ave but it was full. FULL of women and men and trans folks and non binary people and kiddos and dogs and SO MUCH HOPE.
  6. So we headed to Pennsylvania Ave, past Trump's hotel & the White House. Incredible.
  7. While all the speakers did an amazing job, Michael Moore of all people really had a good point. He talked about taking action every day for the next four years.
  8. Calling Senators and Representatives is one thing we can do.
    I have to be honest. I don't do this as much as I want because I'm at work during the hours their phone lines are open and journalists are supposed to be semi neutral. But sometimes I call on my lunch. I can do that more.
  9. We can speak with our money too. That's not just donating (though that's vital). We also can choose which businesses we support.
    Buy from local, minority owned businesses. Maybe we can crowd source a list here? One place to start: STOP SHOPPING AT VICTORIA'S SECRET. No gender diversity in its board or c-suite. Maybe try Naja? Minority founded & owned!!! And such cute lingerie.
  10. We need to fucking volunteer. Look, I get that it's work. But it's usually some of the most rewarding work you can do.
    If you want to know about volunteer opportunities, please ask. Project HEAL & Make-A-Wish are two very non-political organizations to get involved with (if you can't stand to be around politics). If you can, Planned Parenthood or New Alternatives are amazing places I have personal experience with.
  11. We need to get involved on a community level. Go to school board meetings. Check out your local government. Our senators and representatives don't exist in a vacuum. And more progressive cities often are the BEST agents of change.
  12. If you have it in you, run for local office. We need more good people in government.
  13. Lastly, please fucking listen. This one is for my white listers (myself included) who need to give POC/LGBTQ+/disabled people space to be seen and heard. Your feminism must be intersectional, which means getting out of the way and honoring critiques of white people.