BRITISH-ENGLISH WORDS THIS AMERICAN IS TIRED OF USING INSTEAD OF THE ACTUAL WORDS

Cultural imperialism is live and well in Finland when it comes to language. I have two choices: use these words and be understood or stick to my guns and be met with occasional puzzled stares.
  1. plaster
    It's Band-Aid, damn it! Or at the very least bandage.
  2. aubergine
    What the French? Who decided this was a better alternative to eggplant and when?
  3. coriander
    "This coriander smells like cilantro," I thought to myself. LO AND BEHOLD, they are one in the same here. In the U.S., cilantro is a leafy herb used in delicious things like guacamole and coriander is the seed of the same plant available in the spice aisle.
  4. "Cheers!"
    Okay, I don't actually use this one. When I end a conversation with "Thank you!" and the other person responds with "Cheers!", I find myself feeling like I am required to say something else, even though I ALREADY SAID THANK YOU AND ATTEMPTED TO END THE EXCHANGE.
  5. queue
    Oh. My. God. Finnish people "queue" for everything. They also have those little take-a-number things everywhere that I only vaguely remember seeing at the deli counter in supermarkets. Know what else? "Queue" functions as a noun AND a verb. Ugh.
  6. biscuit
    I have yet to find buttermilk biscuits anywhere here, therefore your use of "biscuit" instead of cookie is WRONG.
  7. football
    American football IS football. The sport you're talking about is soccer.
  8. jumper
    I remember annoying kids in high school showing off their new "jumpers" and thinking that using British words would somehow make them more fashionable. News flash! It didn't.
  9. petrol
    I don't even know. Gas station just sounds like a more accurate description for a place associated with chemical fumes and dirty public bathrooms.
  10. terrace
    When did patio go out of fashion? To me, terrace just brings to mind the street names contractors use to make their housing developments seem fancier. Also, the Simpsons lived on Evergreen Terrace, right?
  11. boot
    A boot is a type of shoe, not where you keep your spare tire in your car. Jesus.
  12. lift
    Lift should be used as a verb, elevator should be used for the box you can ride in that ascends and descends tall buildings so that lazy people like me don't have to take the stairs.
  13. mate
    I am not your mate. I do not recall producing offspring with you. Back off, dude.