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  1. 1.
    The War of Art, Steven Pressfield
  2. 2.
    On Writing, Stephen King
  3. 3.
    Story, Robert McKee
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  1. Terribly
  2. Horribly
  3. Thoroughly
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A totally subjective list for your viewing pleasure.
  1. 7.
    True Detective
    Before you discount this list, I'm basing this choice solely on the first season, and possibly solely on the six-minute, single-take tracking shot in Episode 4. I'd never been so mesmerized by a scene. (For what it's worth, I haven't watched S2.)
  2. 6.
    The Wire
    Great writing. Great cast. Great storylines. But I found myself getting less interested with each season. RIP Wallace.
  3. 5.
    The Office
    The Office rejuvenated network comedy. The little British show that leapt across the pond left its parentage behind even in the first season. A stellar cast of writer/actors made for compelling, cringe-worthy, utterly rewatchable episodes—until Michael left. His departure certainly came too soon. (TWSS!)
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Excerpted from "Don't Fear the Reaper: Why Every Author Needs an Editor." Read more about each tip in Chapter 2. http://blke.co/1OG5oi7
  1. 1.
    Rest your manuscript.
    When you’ve finished typing the last word of your masterpiece, set it aside for a few days. If you can stand it, set it aside for a week or more. Essentially, you want to try to forget everything you’ve written, so that when you do come back to self-edit, the book almost seems as if someone else wrote it. You want new eyes, and the best way to do that is to rid your mind of what it’s been consumed by for so long.
  2. 2.
    Print your manuscript, or read it out loud.
    In On Writing Well, William Zinsser wrote, “Examine every word you put on paper. You'll find a surprising number that don't serve any purpose.” For some, seeing their digitized words on paper or hearing them read aloud helps them discover useless words and catch errors they otherwise wouldn’t have seen.
  3. 3.
    Search for troubling words.
    All writers have specific words and phrases that (which?) always cause them to (too?) second-guess whether (weather?) they’re (their?) using them correctly. If you know what your (you’re?) troubling words are, use your word processor’s search function to locate every possible variant of that word or phrase.
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