Famous People Who Were Way Too Honest About Their Movies

It's always special when a big-name actor or director says "fuck it" and admits to the press that they created something which in fact made the world worse. (click for full) http://goo.gl/279Smb
  1. Nicolas Cage And His Colleagues Launch A Social Media Protest Against Their Own Movie
    Cinematographer Gabriel Kosuth wrote an article for Variety which outlined his criticisms while carefully distancing himself from the movie, but Schrader, Cage, and others went for an even more subtle tactic. They went on social media, taking selfies of themselves wearing T-shirts printed with text from the non-disparagement agreement.
  2. David Cross Gets In Trouble For Trashing His Alvin And The Chipmunks Sequel
    the fact that he had to appear in these movies didn't mean he had to promote them. Which is why, after fulfilling his contractual obligations with Chipwrecked, he proceeded to shit all over these movies to the press. (If he had signed one of those non-disparagement agreements, he either didn't know or didn't care.) He told audiences to avoid it during one late-night talk show appearance, describing Chipwrecked to the press as "without question, the most unpleasant experience I've ever had."
  3. A Director Who Made A Movie Satirizing Directors Who Disown Their Own Movies Wound Up Disowning His Movie
    Screenwriter Joe Eszterhas and director Arthur Hiller came up with a funny idea for a movie that became Burn Hollywood Burn, starring Eric Idle, Sylvester Stallone, and Jackie Chan. The plot concerns a director (played by Idle) who makes a film which, due to studio interference, is re-cut behind his back into a terrible movie that he wants nothing to do with, but he finds himself unable to remove his name from the project because -- get this -- his actual name is Alan Smithee.
  4. A Director Makes An Insane Public Apology For His Disastrous Burt Reynolds Musical
    Rather than ineffectually flailing to defend his cinematic poop, Bogdanovich made the unconventional decision to run a nationwide apology for the film in a whole bunch of American newspapers. At least, we think it's an apology, given that even professional linguists are probably unable to decode what appears to be one part passive-aggressive rant and two parts whiskey regret.
  5. Bill Cosby Makes A Terrible Comedy, Tells The Public Not To See It
    Cosby knew it was going to be a disaster. What ensued was a bizarre game of hot potato in which everyone involved tried to pretend they had nothing to do with it. Thus, weeks before the movie even appeared in cinemas, Cosby appeared on Larry King Live to basically discourage his fans from seeing it, because it wasn't truly his movie and had been botched by the director. Remember: This is a movie which Cosby himself produced and wrote.