Really Specific Products You Didn’t Know Were Monopolies

These companies figured out their one true purpose in life: to make the best thing that no one else cared enough to perfect. (click for full) goo.gl/i1f1JP
  1. Baby Blankets
    Medline has had a monopoly since the 1950s, when they first brought their signature style into the world. They've produced about 25 million of them since the '80s alone. Once you throw in numerous washings (what, you didn't think your brand new kid was special enough to get a brand new blanket, right?), that explains why almost every baby born in an American hospital, and countless around the world, have been tucked inside their product.
  2. Presidential Shoes
    Johnston & Murphy trace their roots back to 1850, when our 13th and greatest president, Millard Fillmore, decided he needed some sweet-ass kicks. You might remember him as the last Whig to hold the highest office in the land, and also the creator of My Two Dads. Thanks, Wikipedia!
  3. Fortune Cookies
    Every single fortune cookie you get comes from a single factory in Queens, New York, named Wonton Food, Inc., where they crank out 4 million of those bad boys a day.
  4. Body of Christ Wafers
    The Cavanagh Company makes over 850 million wafers (betcha can't eat just one) a year. But these days there are new problems to tackle, not least of which is the demand for a gluten-free version of their holy wafer, which could lead to their competition getting an edge.
  5. Spacesuits
    ILC Dover, located near the Delaware capital, began as a bra manufacturer in the 1930s. You may question how a company that makes ladies' frilly unmentionables would turn into a specialized enterprise that requires surgical precision, and fair enough. It turns out that the company that was Playtex split into several divisions after World War II, and the newly minted ILC Dover was tasked with making helmets and suits for the United States Air Force.