Amy Poehler's 'Yes, Please' Is Helping ME Cope With My Divorce

Amy Poehler's book is amazing. So if you haven't read it, you should. Instead of discussing her divorce, she has a wonderful chapter about books on divorce that she would write to help people get through. At the end she wrote something that had kept me calm, made me hopeful, and helped me out of some dark times. Here it is … all credit goes to Amy
  1. My hope is these manuals help you navigate a supremely shitty time.
    Divorce is a rough thing to go through. At some point in your life you thought you had it all figured out, and then, when you're divorcing, you feel like you don't have anything figured out anymore.
  2. I promise you, someday happy couples won't make you cry anymore.
    This is one of the worst parts of my depression. I literally get a stomachache when I see happy couples doing things my ex-wife and I used to do. I shouldn't let anyone's happiness bother me that much. I guess I just fear that I'll never have that again
  3. Someday you may be in one again.
    She made sure to put that it's a possibility, not a certainty. Many of my friends say I'll find the right person. But how do they know? I don't want to settle for someone just because I'm getting older and there are less people available. I want to find the right person. I think we only have one life, so I want to spend it with the right person
  4. Someday you will wake up feeling 51% happy and slowly, molecule by molecule, you will feel like yourself again.
    I'm progressing towards this. I can honestly say that before the divorce, I was truly happy. I had a baby. A wonderful wife that I loved. I enjoyed my job. I had a house. Everything was good. So, to get blindsided by everything really took a toll on me. I have good days and bad. More bad than good. But I'm getting there. I'm hopeful. That's a big start.
  5. Or you will lose your mind and turn into a crazy person.
    Well, in perfect Amy Poehler sarcasm, she mentions the second scenario. Here's hoping my medicine and soon-to-start therapy keep this from happening