WRESTLING INSIDER TERMS

There are a lot more than this but these will give you a leg up to talk to your hardcore wrestling friends without feeling completely in the dark
  1. Angle - a scripted storyline. In wrestling, angles can often be silly and or ridiculous. In one famous and horrible angle octogenarian female wrestler Mae Young was pregnant and gave birth to a "damn hand!" (As spoken by famous announcer Jim Ross known affectionately as "Good Ol' JR")
  2. Booker - name for the person or persons who decide the outcome of a match. If there is a team the lead is called the head booker.
  3. Blade - to cut yourself either before or during the match, often on the forehead to make it seem as if you were legitimately bleeding after being hit by an object like a bat, or a turnbuckle or an elbow
  4. Bump - To be hit or thrown or slammed down and usually spoken of in the past tense. "I took a lot of bumps last night" A wrestler unwilling to bump usually won't make it far.
  5. Dark Match - an untelevised match that takes place before the official matches on a tv taping or ppv
  6. Face - Also called the "babyface". The face never resorts to dirty tactics like hair pulls or eye pokes to win a match. Hulk Hogan and Hulkamania in the 1980's created the prototype for the modern babyface.
  7. Getting over - a measurement of popularity. A wrestler has to work hard to get over with the fans, but once you're over, you're over for life. Anything can be "over" an organization, a manager, an angle, a feud, etc.
  8. Heat - When a reaction is provoked, either positive or negative. A heel that taunts the crowd and gets booed and a face with great mic work winning the title are good examples. Cheap Heat is when someone on the microphone says something designed to provoke an instant reaction. "It's good to be back in CHICAGO" for instance is a good example of this
    Side note: there's a special kind of heat called X-Pac Heat named after the wrestler Sean Waltman who was booed because the audience hated him
  9. Heel - the "badguy" wrestler often played as cocky or demeaning to the faces (goodguys). Scott Hall, during the famous WCW NWO run from 1996-1998, made fun of this by asking the fans a "survey" of who they were here for. Usually everyone would cheer loudly for the NWO, a group of badguys, and he would say "one more for the good guys".
  10. Hot Tag - this happens in a tag team match (or other match with more than 4 wrestlers)when one wrestler has endured what seems like a tremendous beating and then manages to tag in his partner who has been on the outside of the ring ropes desparately trying to tag in. Upon entering this wrestler then proceeds to closeline and demolish all opponents
  11. Jobber - a wrestler who is booked to lose. It can also be used as a verb in a command like "do the job" which means you agree to lose the match.
  12. Juice - to legitimately be bleeding during a match as opposed to blading. Also used as a verb, as in: he's really juicing out there. Brock Lesnar is known for juicing and working stiff during big ppv matches
  13. Kayfabe - the illusion that wrestling and the character that a wrestler is playing and all scripted situations are entirely real. In the old days kayfabe was kept at all times and a heel would never be seen with a face in public at any time outside of a wrestling match.
  14. Mark - a mark is someone (usually a fan) who believes wholeheartedly and somewhat excitedly in what they have seen. It can also be used as a verb. For example: I marked out so hard when Hogan joined the NWO. Many wrestlers admit to being "big time marks" for other famous wrestlers
  15. Montreal Finish - named after the screwjob finish where shawn michaels reversed Brett Hart's submission hold "the sharpshooter" and the ref rang rang the bell signalling victory for Michaels even though Hart did not submit. Since then its become kind of a euphamism in wrestling for a dirty underhanded tactic
  16. Pop - loud reaction from a crowd. ie: "the crowd really popped tonight", or "Mick Foley got a big pop from the crowd for his surprise introduction
  17. Push - a wrestler who has been elevated to a position higher than what he has earned with his performance for an extended period of time. The word is more an invention of the cable tv and ppv age with wrestlers getting hours and hours of time on screen in a short amount of time that just didn't exist before.
  18. Sell - To overemphasize the affectiveness of something. Usually this applies to a wrestler "selling" how badly a move hurt him for instance by grabbing his body part in pain or flailing or bouncing wildly. Anything can be sold like a sponsor product ie Mountain Dew or a new movie release. "I love Mountain Dew and check out the new movie!"
  19. Shoot - To break kayfabe. Often this involves a wrestler with a microphone saying how he really feels about someone. The most famous example is CM Punk sitting down for 10 minutes discussing his role in the WWE and how he was held down by management. A match where it is thought to be real is referred to as a "shoot match"
  20. Smart - someone who is "enlightened" to the business. Many fans think they are a smart and know whats going on. In the old days to train a young wrestler many old timers would seek to hurt or cause intense pain during training manuevers in order to smarten them up.
  21. Smark - a derogatory term used in reference to fans who read a lot about wrestling on the internet and think they are smart to the business but are really still marks.
  22. Spot - a pre-scripted high impact move where a wrestler goes up in the air and hits the wrestling ring floor. A match with a lot of high impact moves is known as a "spot fest"
  23. Work - a scripted event that is supposed to appear to be a shoot such as a major injury, designed to appeal to the "hardcore" fan who believes they are seeing behind the curtain so to speak. "These fans thought they were seeing a shoot but really they were getting worked."
  24. Work rate - a loose term referring to a variety of things such as the number of moves a wrestler does (moveset), how many bumps he takes, and how often he wrestles