13 Tips for Getting More Reading Done

Of my hundreds of happiness-project resolutions, and of the habits I’ve tried to form, one of my very favorites is to read more. (Read the full article here: http://bit.ly/28kYFa7 )
  1. 1.
    Quit reading.
    I used to pride myself on finishing every book I started. No more. Life is short. There are too many wonderful books to read.
  2. 2.
    Read books you enjoy.
  3. 3.
    Watch recorded TV.
    It’s much more efficient to watch recorded shows, because you skip the commercials and control when you watch. Then you have more time to read.
  4. 4.
    Skim.
  5. 5.
    Get calm.
    It’s sometimes hard for me to settle down with a book; I keep wanting to jump up and take care of some nagging task. But that’s no way to read.
  6. 6.
    Don't fight inclinations.
    Sometimes I feel like I should be reading one book when I actually feel like reading something entirely different. Now I let myself read what I want, because otherwise I end up reading much less.
  7. 7.
    Always have something to read.
    Never go anywhere empty-handed.
  8. 8.
    Maintain a big stack.
    I find that I read much more when I have a pile waiting for me.
  9. 9.
    Choose my own books.
    Books make wonderful gifts – both to receive and to give – but I try not to let myself feel pressured to read a book just because someone has given it to me. I always give a gift book a try, but I no longer keep reading if I don’t want to.
  10. 10.
    Set aside time to read taxing books.
    Every weekend, I spend time in “study” reading — which covers books that I find fascinating, but that are demanding, and that I might put down and neglect to pick up again.
  11. 11.
    “Read at whim! Read at whim!” Randall Jarrell
  12. 12.
    “Read the best books first, otherwise you’ll find you do not have time.” Henry David Thoreau
  13. 13.
    “What we read with inclination makes a much stronger impression. If we read without inclination, half the mind is employed in fixing the attention; so there is but one half to be employed on what we read.” Samuel Johnson