I'm having a feminist crisis

This is a list about Tangled please carry on
  1. So Tangled is my among favorite Disney princess movies
  2. Rapunzel is a great character with hopes and dreams outside of finding a man and also Flynn Rider/Eugene is fine as hell
  3. And the story is fun and interesting, the animation is beautiful, and the music is amazing
    This scene makes me cry every time bye
  4. BUT! Is this movie feminist?
  5. It passes the Bechdel test and has well-rounded and complex female characters, but I've been thinking about the ending and I need to talk about it
  6. So we all know that the vast majority of Rapunzel's identity lies in her hair
  7. She is able to heal people with it, but that gift gets exploited by her "mother," who keeps her trapped/enslaved in the castle
  8. So when Eugene cuts her hair at the end of the movie...
  9. Is he saving her from the exploitation and servitude??
  10. Or revoking her agency and her sense of identity??
  11. Is he continuing "Mother's" abusive ways of keeping Rapunzel from making her own decisions with her "safety" in mind?
  12. Or is this a final act of selfless love?
  13. What's your take?
  14. I think the ending—where Rapunzel is portrayed as a beloved and capable ruler—is super important because it shows that her identity is in fact a whole lot more than her hair. Her sincerity, her gentleness, her charm, and her empathy remain even when her hair is gone, showing that "power" as Gothel defined it is passing while character is enduring
    And therefore maybe we can justify Eugene's actions without making him out to be a controlling jerk
    Suggested by   @hannah_rachel
  15. Ok I have thought about this a lot.
    Basically I think that the end they both give the ultimate act of true love, in that they sacrifice themselves for each other. She says "I'll be our slave forever I'll never complain of you just let him live" - effectively giving up her life. And then he cuts her hair to save her from that and giving up his. To me, because they nth do something so heroic, I don't find it problematic or whatever. It gets me every time.
    Suggested by   @victoriaedel
  16. I think her hair is a large part of her identity because Gothel tells her it is. She is so much more than her hair and her ability to heal and I think Eugene sees that, and that's why he cuts her hair. Not in an effort to control her, but in an effort to free her.
    And neither Eugene or Rapunzel know she has the ability to heal him with her tears. So when Eugene cuts her hair, he does it believing he will die. Because of that I think he was doing it selflessly. He could've let her save him with her hair, but he couldn't live if he knew she was going to continue to be controlled. That's how I see it.
    Suggested by   @chloeabzzz