My horribly short list of books I've read on my gap year

I'm so ashamed that this is so short but maybe making this list will encourage me to lengthen it.
  1. Number 11 by Jonathan Coe
    I read this sequel before the first one but still enjoyed it anyway. It is barely linked to What a Carve Up. Very funny and engaging, Coe is one of my favourites.
  2. What a Carve Up by Jonathan Coe
    Reading the sequel first was a bit disorientating but I got over it. I love a good comedy mystery and books that cover a lot of characters. Kinda creeped me out but in a good way.
  3. Bridge of Spies by Giles Whittell
    I saw and loved the film before I spotted this book in a charity shop. Cold War is my favourite period of history and I really enjoyed this non-fiction book.
  4. Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl by Carrie Brownstein
    I love Portlandia and Sleater Kinney so I figured I better get on a read this book. Really engaging and interesting.
  5. A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
    Classic. I had no idea what happens in this before I read it which was good. A quick read because it's a play but really good. Shocking ending.
  6. On Beauty by Zadie Smith
    I really need to read more Zadie Smith. I've read this and NW and loved both. This particular drew me in because of the differences in the characters despite how close they are together. Really interesting look at love and relationships.
  7. We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo
    Really heartbreaking. Very important topics covered. Was so hard to put down.
  8. Confronting the Classics by Mary Beard
    Everyone loves Mary Beard. This was really great because of its essay style. It wasn't a daunting history book at all because of the way the chapters were broken down into topics.
  9. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling
    Kinda shite but I loved Harry Potter when I was 10 so was nostalgic.
  10. The Plot Against America by Phillip Roth
    I bought this because of the result of the US Election last year. It was really interesting and the parallels are definitely there. I loved the way it covered global politics through ordinary people