ITEMS LABELED “AMERICAN” IN OTHER COUNTRIES

America is a worldwide brand, but it doesn’t carry the same connotations everywhere.
  1. CINTA AMERICANA // "AMERICAN TAPE"
    In Spain, the versatile, do-anything tool we call duct tape is known as cinta americana, or “American tape.”
  2. POING AMÉRICAIN // "AMERICAN FIST"
    In French, a set of brass knuckles are le poing américain, or “the American fist.”
  3. ALFACE AMERICANA // "AMERICAN LETTUCE"
    Brazilian Portuguese has the term alface americana, or “American lettuce,” to refer to iceberg lettuce—or, as one reader informed us, “lettuce like McDonald’s uses.”
  4. AMERIKANSKIE GORKI // "AMERICAN MOUNTAINS"
    In Russian, roller coasters are known as amerikanskie gorki, or “American mountains.” Interestingly, in most of the Romance languages they are known as “Russian mountains.”
  5. AMERIŠKA SOLATA // "AMERICAN SALAD"
    The Slovenians call cole slaw ameriška solata, or “American salad,” as do other countries in Eastern Europe.
  6. AMERIKAANSE STOCK // "AMERICAN STOCK"
    In Belgium, stores that carry camping and hunting equipment, tools, boots, military surplus, and sporting goods often go by Amerikaanse Stock, or “American stock.”
  7. WOLNA AMERYKANKA // "FREE AMERICAN"
    Wolna amerykanka, or “free American,” is a style of catch-as-catch-can, no-restrictions wrestling in Poland. The phrase also has the more general sense of “all bets are off” or anything goes.
  8. AMERIKAANSE FUIF // "AMERICAN PARTY"
    In Dutch, a casual potluck where everyone brings a dish is called an amerikaanse fuif, or "American party." Brazil also uses festa americana to describe this type of event.
  9. AMERIKANDOGGU // "AMERICAN DOG"
    In Japanese, a hot dog is a hottodoggu, but a corn dog is an amerikandoggu.
  10. TOVAGLIETTE ALL’AMERICANA // "AMERICAN PLACEMATS"
    In Italian, a tovaglia is a table cloth. A tovaglietta all’americana, literally "little American tablecloth," is a placemat. In Brazil, placemats are also considered American; sets of them are called jogo americano, or “American set.”