SOUNDS THAT KIDS TODAY HAVE PROBABLY NEVER HEARD

Youths don't know what they're missing.
  1. Rotary Dial Telephone
    The old swooosh as the caller rotated the dial clockwise to the "finger stop" and then the click-click-click as the dial returned counter-clockwise to the start position is now a novelty application that you can install on your iPhones for nostalgic fun.
  2. Manual Typewriter
    The keys clacked loudly as they struck the paper, the carriage lifted up with a distinct clunk when the shift key was employed, and then there was the ping of the bell warning you that you were nearing the end of the line.
  3. Flash Cube
    The loud rapid-fire click-clack of an Instamatic camera equipped with a flash cube was a common background sound at any social gathering in the 1960s.
  4. TV Channel Selector
    The standard TV dial went from 2 to 13, and you had to click on each number as you searched for one of the three channels that broadcast in your area. That meant a lot of clunk clunk-ing interspersed with the static-y sound of "snow" on the blank stations.
  5. Gas Station Driveway Bell
    Back in the days when all gas stations were full-service, the thin black pneumatic hose that snaked across the pavement was as familiar as the fuel pumps.
  6. TV Station Sign-Off
    You'd hear "We now conclude our broadcast day..." around 2AM or so. The format varied little from station to station across the country; first a few technical details were announced (broadcast frequency, physical address of the station, etc.), then a reading of "High Flight" followed by the National Anthem, and then the steady beeeeeeeeeeeeeep tone of the test pattern.
  7. Cash Register
    Those push buttons were clumsy, but veteran cashiers could check you out just as fast with these old-style machines as their modern counterparts do with today's scanners.
  8. Film Projector
    One of the jobs of the classroom A/V squad captain was to run the film projector on movie days. The rapid tick-tick-tick of the sprockets really was that loud.
  9. Broken Record
    The repetitive effect that happened when the needle got stuck and played the same few notes over and over and over again.