Being Black in America Means...

  1. Being afraid of ending up on the wrong side of a police officer's temper, and consequently his gun
    and knowing nothing can save you but a miraculous change of heart or miraculous drop in melanin....the latter is less plausuble, but more probable
  2. Constantly having to defend yourself by legitimizing your oppression
    This really happens. I don't care that you don't see it. You are only open to one perspective, YOURS, which obviously does NOT include the black narrative, even and especially when it permeates all forms of the ENTIRE COUNTRY'S MEDIA. Several seats for you, boo.
  3. Speaking constructively on topics of modern social injustice in a humanitarian award speech, and becoming the target for an oppressive group's flaming arrows of ignorance
    Dear White People Who Were Angered By Jesse Williams' Speech (not all white people!!!), This was not meant for you. This was not even aimed at you. There are major issues in America, affecting black people, that need to be addressed, by black people. If this speech, that you chose to watch, did not awaken in you a sense of responsibility or minimally respect for this movement, please reevaluate with some semblance of sensitivity.
  4. Asking that the lives of a group of people be, minimally, recognized as lives, and being told to not be exclusionary, but regard all lives as equally important, even though it's been proven several times over that they're not
    The #BlackLivesMatter movement is not meant to be exclusionary, which I think most people in this community have come to realize. It is simply meant to open a lane for a targeted group of people the ability to excercise RIGHTS that have been withheld so long that they're now pronounced PRIVILEGES . Living should not fit in this category. Period.
  5. Mourning people you don't know with the same weight as ones you do
    And as many as there are every year, try and imagine what it's like to live in a perpetual state of grief. Better yet, imagine everyone who looks like you dropping like flies and hoping to God every day that it's not you or someone you know. Or letting it feel distant until it's brought to your home, your school, your church, your neighborhood, your local drug store. Try and feel that, and then we can talk.
  6. Having to be very intentional about the messgae you're conveying to avoid stirring the pot too much
    No, it's not aimed at everyone. No, i don't hate white people. No, I'm not angry, but if I was could you blame me? Yes, I'm open to conversation. Yes, you can ask questions.