What's Something We Make in America Today That's Made the Same Way It Was 100 Years Ago?

Our "History Dept." reporter Linton Weeks wants your help with a project. He's trying to collect examples of "history-in-action" spots in the U.S. where people are producing something using historic methods. Throw your suggestions in the comments! (We may reach out to you for the story) More info: http://n.pr/1S2j75T
  1. Example: Brewery in a museum
    Carillon Historical Park in Dayton, Ohio, has created a brewery that bills itself as "the nation's only production brewery in a museum." Leo DeLuca, a spokesman for the historical park, says: "Carillon Brewing Co. tells Dayton's story via 1850s beer-making methods, recipes, historic fare, and costumed interpreters. Our brewster — the term for an 1850s female beer-maker — brews on a 14-foot brick furnace in full costume." You can even try the beer after a tour.
  2. Canning fruit preserves and produce
    People have been preserving food forever through drying, smoking and fermentation. But it wasn't until 100 years ago (1915 to be exact) that Alexander H. Kerr developed the 2-part canning lid. It's still used today and the renewed interest in home canning across the country has made it even more popular.
    Suggested by   @eatthelove
  3. Moon Marble Co. https://www.moonmarble.com still making marbles the old-fashioned way!
    Suggested by   @justanavrgguy
  4. My friends at DWRI letterpress in Providence, RI hand set metal type for invitations, stationery, pencils and such.
    Suggested by   @boygirlparty
  5. Steel, lugged bicycle frame. There are plenty of custom frame builders out there doing it the same way they did 100 years ago.
    Suggested by   @llamavishnu
  6. North House Folk School in Grand Marais, MN
    Regional artisans and craftspeople teach traditional techniques for everything from boatbuilding to basketry.
    Suggested by   @ladyprofessor
  7. American College of the Building Arts in Charleston, SC is the only school to offer degrees in traditional building techniques. http://www.citylab.com/work/2015/02/the-college-of-lost-arts/385644/
    Suggested by   @WidowPage
  8. Babies
    Suggested by   @amieshmamie