THE BEST WOODY ALLEN FILMS OF ALL TIME ACCORDING TO GUY

  1. 21.
    September
  2. 20.
    Melinda and Melinda
  3. 19.
    Another Woman
  4. 18.
    Shadows and Fog
  5. 17.
    Bullets Over Broadway
  6. 16.
    Matchpoint
  7. 15.
    Zelig
  8. 14.
    Play it Again, Sam
  9. 13.
    Manhattan
  10. 12.
    Radio Days
  11. 11.
    Husbands and Wives
  12. 10.
    Annie Hall
  13. 9.
    Deconstructing Harry
  14. 8.
    Small Time Crooks
  15. 7.
    Interiors
  16. 6.
    Blue Jasmine
  17. 5.
    Sleeper
  18. 4.
    The Purple Rose of Cairo
    Mia Farrow plays Cecila, a wife who escapes her loveless marriage and fulfills her boredom watching “The Purple Rose of Cairo.” She falls in love with the movie’s character, played by Jeff Daniels, who jumps out the screen on onto real life in which Cecila is stuck by making a strange decision: is she in love with the movie character or Jeff Daniels playing the character? This is Woody’s excellent meditation on the power of movies in our lives and our trouble distinguishing fantasy and reality.
  19. 3.
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Martin Landau plays as the wealthy ophthalmologist who commits murder on his mistress (played by Anjelica Houston) and comes to terms with his own guilt by asking a serious ethical (and religious) question: can one live a moral life after committing murder? As with most Woody’s films that tackle this subject, Woody went on to earn three Academy awards for Crimes and Misdemeanors including Best Director.
  20. 2.
    Broadway Danny Rose
    This is Woody Allen at his peak, where his writing developed with more pathos and his acting with Mia Farrow brought out the best in each other’s performance. As a parody on NYC lounge acts of the 1950s, Broadway Danny Rose has one of the most sympathetic characters (the kooky and nebbish agent) within his film arsenal.
  21. 1.
    Hannah and Her Sisters
    Annie Hall and Manhattan are surely praised for its stories, but Hannah and Her Sisters is the unsung hero of cinematic genius. Told in seasons, the movie captures many small and universal moments: religion, love, sex, trust, friendships, sibling rivalries, and the many things we tell ourselves.