Lucas, like every filmmaker, stood on the shoulders of giants to build his masterpiece, and with this feature, we look back on some of the most obvious strands of Star Wars‘ DNA. Read the full article here ---> http://tmto.es/VZWHC
  1. THE HIDDEN FORTRESS (KAKUSHI-TORIDE NO SAN-AKUNIN) (1958) - FRESH AT 100%
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    A princess and a scoundrel on a mission behind enemy lines, with a pair of squabbling nincompoops helping them along the way. Sound familiar?
  2. THE SEARCHERS (1956) - CERTIFIED FRESH AT 100%
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    Director John Ford inspired a slew of filmmakers across multiple generations — including Akira Kurosawa, whose The Hidden Fortress makes an appearance elsewhere in this list — and his shadow looms large over the Skywalker family saga told across the first six Star Wars films, primarily during the chapters that take place on the desert planet of Tatooine
  3. THE DAM BUSTERS (1954) 100%
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    George Lucas drew on plenty of war movies for inspiration while crafting the climactic battle sequences for Star Wars, but while watching the Rebels’ first run on the Death Star, there’s one film that stands out in particular: 1955’s The Dam Busters.
  4. METROPOLIS (1927) - CERTIFIED FRESH AT 99%
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    Star Wars’ biggest debt to Metropolis might be the visual design of Maschinenmensch, the iconic female robot whose looks were obviously never far from artist Ralph McQuarrie’s mind while he was creating his concept art for C-3PO.
  5. FLASH GORDON CONQUERS THE UNIVERSE (1940) - FRESH AT 86%
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    George Lucas was so enamored of the 1936 Flash Gordon film serial that he tried optioning the rights to a new adaptation from producer Dino de Laurentiis — and if those meetings had turned out differently, he might have put his own stamp on the venerable comic franchise instead of opting to set out on his own with Star Wars.
  6. TRIUMPH DES WILLENS (TRIUMPH OF THE WILL) (1935) - FRESH AT 94%
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    The line between democracy and fascism isn’t always as airtight as we’d like to think — which is why it’s sort of fitting that the joyous denouement of the first episode, in which our protagonists are paraded through a room full of Rebel soldiers and given medals for their heroism, bears direct visual echoes of a scene from Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will, in which Hitler and his generals march before a huge army standing at attention.