FUN THINGS ABOUT BEING ON BLOOD THINNERS

Almost 18 months ago I found out (the hard way - via a pulmonary embolism & multiple DVTs/blood clots) that I have a blood disorder (Anti-Phospholipid Syndrome with a Hypercoaguable State). The treatment is lifelong blood thinners. I take xarelto every day. Here are some of the fun things that are now a part of my life as a result...
  1. Any little cut means blood. A lot of it.
    I cut my thumb on the tip this afternoon which chopping an onion. And I am still staunching the little tiny cut's bleeding 20 mins later.
  2. Fear of a brain bleed.
    The doctor in the hospital told me never to hit my head. No skiing, nothing that might result in a head injury because if so? Lights out, apparently. This is fine. I don't ski. But the first time I hit my head, on the garage door, I had a huge panic attack.
  3. No tattoos.
    Totally okay with this. Never had one never will.
  4. Incredible change in my menstrual cycle.
    I was always the girl who could wear one little wingless pad all day in the middle of my four-day cycle. Now? It's usually a full seven days and I have to wear overnight pads during the day and change them every couple of hours. So many accidents in the last year you'd think I was 13 again...
  5. Cellulitis.
    A skin infection I had never heard about. Until I got it on my ear. Apparently common for people with my condition. Horrible painful. Antibiotics. No fun.
  6. UTIs and kidney infections galore.
    Again, apparent common. After several trips to urgent care last fall I've now started taking cranberry pills every day.
  7. A pill every day for the rest of my life.
    This is new for me. And weird. Once, when filling my little daily pill box that my dad gave me I couldn't remember if I'd taken that day's pill or not. Full on anxiety attack. Called dad, who's on same medicine, and he said it was fine. Tomorrow take it and move on. I now have a reminder set on my iPhone.
  8. Increased dose of the medicine when traveling.
    The day before and day of a flight my dose increases by 50%. So no hopping a plane at a moment's notice for me.
  9. Blood tests and visits to the hematologist.
    Every four months I have to get a whole panel of blood tests on a Monday morning and then the following Monday I get to hang out at the hematologist/oncologist's office waiting to hear about the results. They monitor a lot of different levels and so far so good...
  10. And best of all? No more DVTs! Life! Nothing else matters!!!