Why I Love Orson Welles' The Trial

Released in 1962. Starring Anthony Perkins
  1. I don't think a lot of people have seen this movie. It's a shame, because it's pretty fascinating. If you're into a coherent, easy-to-follow film, this one might not be for you. It's based on a Kafka book, which means you get to see Perkins squirm like a bug in scene after scene. He's trapped in endless bureaucracy with no hope of a solution.
  2. This film, to me, is mostly about the visuals. Welles uses oblique camera angles, odd focus, light and shadows and great mise-en-scène to set a claustrophobic mood. Perkins seems like he's surrounded by an infinite clutter of humans and objects.
  3. The paranoia of being watched and judged for something you can't quite explain or understand is one of the main points of The Trial. Also, there's no logic or reason to fight the system. You can try all you want, but they won't listen.
  4. My favorite scene: Perkins is running through a tunnel made of wooden boards. The shadows create the sense of being imprisoned. At the same time, there are these glaring eyes looking through the boards. This really encapsulates the feelings of dread and being trapped that is on display throughout.