This Week in Social Journalism

Here’s everything I learned this week from others’ work using social as a reporting tool.
  1. NPR highlighted Jorge Ramos’ use of Facebook Live on the campaign trail, and the rapid growth he’s experiencing from live broadcasts.
  2. Tribeca is spotlighting the best Snapchat storytelling with a new “Snapchat Shorts” program. Judges will pick 10 winners that will be screened during the 2016 festival in NYC.
  3. Results from the Guardian Sport’s live streaming experiment during the Westminster Dog Show: better engagement from Periscope, but more archived views from FB Live.
  4. The BBC adds Yik Yak to their chat-app repertoire, engaging with millennials around their new series on mental health.
  5. Snapchat’s Live Stories are the new “it” place to be during the 2016 campaign. The Times had a deep dive into the social platform and the refreshing filter it’s giving to this election cycle.
  6. Mark Luckie (formerly Twitter News) joined Reddit as Head of Journalism and Media. It’s time to get excited about Reddit again.
  7. Here is the series of questions Buzzfeed asks to measure success: 1) Does the asset work across platforms? 2) Does it click internationally? 3) Does it help people connect with one another? 4) Does it improve their lives?5) Does it inform the public and change institutions? 6) Does it make the world more open and diverse?
  8. Quartz’ new app is less a news app than a chat-app.
  9. The Boston Globe's James Pindell is covering the 2016 Election on Instagram, email, Twitter, Facebook, and Snapchat. Check out last week’s Nieman Lab story on his work.
  10. Storyful has used WhatsApp as a resource for sources, tips, and breaking news content. First Draft News has a great story this week called "WhatsApp at 1 billion: How can journalists use the chat app for news gathering?”
  11. #Longread alert: Prepare to have your mind blown over teen’s ability to exploit social media for money, influence and fame. Google “New Republic Secret Lives of Tumblr Teens”
  12. Digiday profiled CNN's distributed content experiment, "Great Big Story.” Of Great Big Story’s 30-person staff, one-third consists of video producers, one-third is sales, and 20% are in audience development. They produce three to five videos a day — typically in the two- to four-minute range.
  13. On Medium, Jeff Jarvis and Carrie Brown published their syllabus on a community engagement course they're teaching at CUNY.