HOW TO BELIEVE IN YOURSELF: NURTURING POSITIVE VIEWS 🌞

You're beautiful. You're amazing. We want you to always know this about yourself. For the full article: www.wikihow.com/Believe-in-Yourself
  1. Make a list of your past accomplishments.
    After you’ve compiled a short list, try to find patterns in the activities. Identify what you have done well over and over again to understand your skills.
  2. Talk to people who love you.
    Sometimes we have difficulty seeing the best things about ourselves, but the people who love us will never struggle to see those things.
  3. Find a cause that you believe in.
    It may be difficult to believe in yourself if you are always trying to please others. Make sure that you look for causes and projects that appeal to you and that you actually believe in. The passion that you feel for these causes and projects will help you to work harder and see how much you can achieve.
  4. Set realistic goals.
    Setting realistic goals will help you to believe in yourself and your ability to accomplish things. Make sure that you develop goals that are in line with your skills and that are attainable. Be prepared to go outside of your comfort zone now and then. After you set a goal, work hard until you achieve it. Don’t abandon a goal because it becomes too difficult. If a goal seems too difficult, try breaking it into a series of smaller goals and focus on one at a time.
  5. Reflect at the end of each day.
    Self-reflection is an important component of self-improvement. It helps you to take stock of what you are doing well and what you still need to work on. Take a few moments at the end of each day to reflect on your experiences.
  6. Be persistent.
    Sometimes we feel like giving up because failure is a possibility, but it’s perfectly natural to struggle with something the first time you do it. Instead of blaming yourself for doing something wrong, give yourself permission to experiment without worrying about the consequences. Some of the most successful innovators have found that improvisation requires a sort of “playful” mindset as opposed to one that is fixated on a single goal.