Today is National Donut Day!
  1. Koeksisters (South African)
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    Koeksisters are a popular and very tasty South African treat. They are similar to doughnuts, except they are twisted or braided, and coated in syrup. www.wikihow.com/Make-Koeksisters
  2. Loukoumades (Greek)
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    Loukoumades are a delicious Greek dessert enjoyed in moderation. With history suggesting these doughnuts were served to ancient Olympic winners as a honey treat, these desserts can be served and enjoyed not only at any Greek themed dinner but are also compatible to be served with any middle Eastern themed dinner. www.wikihow.com/Make-Loukoumades
  3. Malasadas (Portuguese)
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    Malasadas are Portuguese doughnuts that are very popular in both Massachusetts and Hawaii. However, unlike regular doughnuts, malasadas do not have holes in the middle. These doughnuts are also deep fried and coated in sugar. www.wikihow.com/Make-Malasadas
  4. Okinawan Dangos (Japanese)
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    When one hears the phrase, "Okinawan Dango", it is easy to be overtaken by nostalgia for the Japanese Obon festivals. Also referred to as "sata andagi", this Japanese deep fried doughnut is different from the the American doughnut, as there is no glaze or sugar on top. While the crust is crisp, the inside is cake-like in texture and it is enjoyed hot, at the moment it's made. www.wikihow.com/Make-Okinawan-Dangos
  5. Oliebollen (Dutch New Year’s Doughnuts)
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    In the Netherlands, Oliebollen is a traditional snack enjoyed on New Year's Eve. If you're looking for a truly special doughnut recipe to make for a New Year's Eve party, a birthday or some other celebration, then this version my be just the sweet treat you're looking for. www.wikihow.com/Make-Oliebollen-%28Dutch-New-Year%27s-Doughnuts%29
  6. Sufganiyot (Israeli Jelly Donut)
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    Chanukkah - also spelled Hanukkah - is the Jewish Festival of Lights. It's a time for celebrations and good food. One of the star attractions on the dining table on the second day of this nine-day celebration is sufganiyot, and deep-fried, jelly-filled doughnuts are served. These melt-in-your mouth desserts are enjoyed by children and adults alike! www.wikihow.com/Make-Sufganiyot-%28Israeli-Jelly-Donuts%29
  7. For 20+ More Donut Recipes: wikihow.tumblr.com/post/120786650051/happy-national-donut-day-in-the-words-of-homer
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  8. Suggestions?
  9. Beinget
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    France. Basically a square donut without a hole, covered in powdered sugar.
    Suggested by @dev